Sparknotes Blog

Make Your Own Path On A Gap Year
March 4, 2021

Make Your Own Path On A Gap Year

By Marnie Naldone in 2021
You’re on a path. If you’re like most, that path includes going to school, building your resume, working to get good grades, getting into a good college, picking a major, and hopefully landing a rewarding...
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My Israel Gap Year Experience
March 2, 2021

My Israel Gap Year Experience

By Tracey Grant in 2021
I’m forever grateful for the experience of having participated in an Israel gap year and the perspective that year gave me.  While on Year Course I learned so much about myself, my Jewish identity and...
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Persevering With My Peers: Insight into Teen Mental Health
October 28, 2020

Persevering With My Peers: Insight into Teen Mental Health

By Lili Stadler in 2020
I grew up with a school counselor as my mom. Needless to say, I have always known the importance of mental health. Talking about my feelings had never been a problem; in fact, it was...
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Spark Note: Helping Jewish Youth Find Joy and Connection in Challenging Times
May 12, 2020

Spark Note: Helping Jewish Youth Find Joy and Connection in Challenging Times

By Kelly Cohen in Navigating Parenthood
In 2019-20, Moving Traditions has been thrilled to partner with JumpSpark to bring our innovative programs to the Atlanta Jewish community to build the wellbeing and Jewish identity of youth. Now, our lives have been...
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Announcing JumpSpark’s New Navigating Parenthood Coordinator
February 18, 2020

Announcing JumpSpark’s New Navigating Parenthood Coordinator

By developer in 2020
JumpSpark recognized early on that parents are an essential component to an engaged and healthy Jewish teen population.  In response, JumpSpark launched Navigating Parenthood in 2018. Over the past two years JumpSpark has hosted 16...
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Community Examines Social Media Addiction
December 6, 2019

Community Examines Social Media Addiction

By developer in 2019
In a series of community conversations, Atlanta’s Jewish teens were urged to “look up” and spend less time gazing down at their cell phones and electronic gadgets.
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